Damage Estimates


Artist – Joe Heller

In other news, former President Richard Nixon’s testimony to a grand jury in 1975 concerning the Watergate scandal is going to be unsealed, and the Obama Administration is requesting that the Supreme Court consider the Affordable Care Act as soon as possible to put the issue to rest once and for all. I have no doubt they will rule in its favor.

By the way, anyone who wishes can add me on Google+ using the email address found on the contact page.

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  • GrafZeppelin127

    I have no doubt they will rule in its favor.

    I have no doubt that they should, but I doubt that they will.

    Given the state of constitutional law, the Court probably can’t strike down the law without overturning, or carving out an arbitrary ad hoc exception to, Gonzalez v. Raich, 545 U.S. 1 (2005). If the justices are honest and bound to the law, they can’t rule against it.

    But this Supreme Court doesn’t work that way. The reality is that these Justices will do the same thing that Congress does: Whatever their corporate owners order them to do. If the insurance and pharmaceutical industries want it upheld, it will be upheld; if they want it overturned, it’ll be overturned. The outcome will be sold to the highest bidder; the aforementioned lobbies and others are lining up to purchase the outcome as we speak.

    Moreover, the Court now finds itself in the position, for the second time in just over a decade, to choose the next President of the United States, albeit less directly than last time. Obama’s re-election chances, slim-to-none as they are today, will be reduced to zero the moment the Court strikes down the Affordable Care Act. Therefore those who wish to purchase Obama’s defeat next fall (which, again, has probably already been bought) will also be lining up to buy the outcome.

    The court will give the highest bidders what they pay for. Next November, the voters will give them a receipt. And President Romney will provide the return on their investment starting in 2013.

    • mrbrink

      Romney can’t win without the Evangelicals. Without them, the GOP is a fringe minority. You could argue that with them, ideologically, they are a fringe minority.

      George W. Bush should have been toast in 2004, but the left was less than enthused with Kerry and depressed turnout. The right is less than enthused with Romney.

      And I think that sound bite of Romney declaring, “corporations are people, my friend” will hurt him with the middle. His positions are unpopular, he’s unlikable, even within his own party who keeps sending hints by courting Chris Christie and Perry and Herman Cain and on and on.

      He’s seems popular with secular moderates who only know they love a good head of hair on a president.

      He won’t even win the nomination, much less the presidency.

      I consider this a much safer prediction than him beating President Obama.

      • bphoon

        the left was less than enthused with Kerry and depressed turnout.

        Ken Blackwell’s distribution of voting booths/machines in Ohio had more than a little something to do with depressing voter turnout, at least in Democratic areas. That, along with inconsistencies in the way Mr. Diebold’s machines reported vote counts, made at least some of the difference there.

        • mrbrink

          You couldn’t be more correct in so little space.

          It’s the goddamn privatization of democracy. The GOP have to steal elections by caging and purging. They’ve opened the front door to an unprecedented supply of ‘dark- money-interference’– manipulating public opinion by allowing the most money to decide who wins and loses based on stealth marketing. A sell out politician is one thing. A sold out democracy is something akin to fascism.

          But for some reason, unless you’re a right wing republican, it’s bad form to remind people inside the D.C. bubble that right wing conservatives STEAL elections just off camera in the shadow of day.

    • bphoon

      The reality is that these Justices will do the same thing that Congress does: Whatever their corporate owners order them to do.

      I wish you were wrong but, increasingly, I have to say I agree with you. Sad to say…

      • JMAshby

        The industry supports the legislation. That’s why they will rule in favor of it.

  • muselet

    If you want to be depressed, this is worth a read.

    –alopecia

    • ranger11

      I want to be happy actually.

      • muselet

        That can be arranged, too.

        –alopecia

        • ranger11

          Thanks a lot! A nice break from the fun and interesting African-American/Liberal war.