Best Person

This guy rules. Just watch.

Banks have been screwing homeowners 90 different ways. Nice to see someone screwing back.

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  • http://www.intoxination.net intoxination

    This isn’t a typical “they foreclosed on my home” case. Terry Hoskins owned a carpet business that went belly up. He used his home as collateral for his business loan.

    On top of that he owed the IRS over $1.5 million in back taxes for 5 years, which the IRS put a lean on his business for (plus the fact his brother and former business partner successfully sued him), plus he owed the state thousands for sales tax he charged his customers but never turned in.

    Right now there are over 50 active cases against this man for taxes and owing money to people. His problems date back to 2000 for the tax stuff.

    I hate supporting the banks, but in this case I must. This was an idiot who thought he could bilk the system forever. Once they caught up with him, he tried to play the victim card. He shouldn’t be associated with the thousands of actual Americans who struggle and been screwed over by this economy.

    (And I can see you posting this. Channel 5 originally aired this totally on Hoskins side. He was viewed as a hero, but once the rest of the media caught up and found out that he really is at fault here, that heroism he found was quickly gone.)

  • Kevin Hampton

    “Once i seen [sic] that I owed $160k on a $350k property, I whudn’t gonna stand fer it”.

    Nope, equity ain’t no [sic] excuse for not paying it back. The agreement isn’t pay until you owe less than appraise value, then Ef ‘Em. What a loser. So how much jail time does destroying the bank’s property get him? Over/under this one fer [sic] me.

  • http://www.facebook.com/rycarson Ryan Carson

    Yeah, this guy is an idiot. Even if everything intoxication said above was not true, he’d still be an idiot. It’s math. If the bank went to trustee’s sale on his home (non-judicial foreclosure), and he still owed money, the bank can come after him for a deficiency judgment, but only for the difference in market price of the home as compared to the amount of indebtedness. So, by bulldozing his home, he’s basically increased the amount that can be sought as a deficiency.

    Of course, as he’s filing bankruptcy, it’ll be wiped out anyway. This is not what heroes do.