Internet Geeks are Badass

They’ve already come up with a way to circumvent the proposed SOPA law:

Software developers have already found a way around the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which the House Judiciary Committee will not markup until sometime early next year.

Most critics say the bill would create an Internet “blacklist” that forces ISPs, search engines, financial firms and advertisers to de-list websites accused of copyright infringement, all without any actual court hearing or oversight. The legislation takes aim at the Internet’s domain naming system (DNS), which translates domain names like www.google.com to numerical Internet protocol (IP) addresses.

But an add-on for the popular Internet browser FireFox, called DeSopa, would circumvent DNS blockades with the click of a button.

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  • Robert Scalzi

    DeSopa seems to be disabled…. I have tried to find it several times this morning and this is teh message that pops up everytime

    [We're sorry, but we can't find what you're looking for.]

    anyone have a link that works ?? I went direct to Firefox and there is Nuthin.

    • http://twitter.com/GodIsDead Gern Blandston

      Perhaps SOPA got SOPA’d due to all those infernal links linking their linkiness to it. Surely that’s copyright infringement somehow… BURN THEM!

    • muselet

      As of 10:57 AM PST, this link

      https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/desopa/

      was live.

      –alopecia

      • Robert Scalzi

        Thank You !! Done and Done

  • JMAshby

    Draconian anti-piracy laws harm legitimate consumers more than pirates. This has been proven over and over.

  • http://www.intoxination.net intoxination

    This is basically what people did when Wikileaks had their domain records pulled. It’s not really a hack or anything, just an understanding of how HTTP and DNS works.

    There are a few things about this. First you have to know the IP address that domain name is associated to. Luckily those cache pretty aggressively, so if a site has their DNS yanked chances are the record will float around some DNS server somewhere for a few days (DNS changes take time, which is known as propagation).

    I’m sure that plugin or some variation of it will pop-up again. This is a perfect example of Congress not understanding the technologies behind the internet, including the technology of DNS which is one of the oldest. The plugin logic is extremely simple and even without the plugin, any PC user can quickly circumvent the DNS blocks by simple editing their hosts file (add the domain name and IP address and you are done!)

    In other words, the plan Congress has won’t really shut things down. It’s just a speed bump and they really can’t control it beyond that without fundamentally forcing a change to the internet infrastructure, which would cost probably trillions and could cause serious disruptions. A perfect example of that is the IPv6 stuff. They has been an urgent push on for that migration to happen and it’s been going on for almost 10 years now, complete with OMG we are going to have a broken internet warnings being screamed out over that time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/cory.barksdale Cory Barksdale

    Niiiice

  • http://phydeauxpseaks.blogspot.com Bob Rutledge

    If only the late Senator Whatshisface from Alaska were still around. He could clog up the tubes, you betcha.

  • muselet

    I’m surprised it took this long.

    –alopecia