White House to Oppose SOPA, Protect IP

Fantastic news!

The White House on Saturday officially responded to two online petitions, “Stop the E-PARASITE Act” and “Veto the SOPA bill and any other future bills that threaten to diminish the free flow of information,” urging the President to reject SOPA and PIPA.

The statement was drawn up by Victoria Espinel, Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator at Office of Management and Budget, Aneesh Chopra, U.S. Chief Technology Officer, and Howard Schmidt, Special Assistant to the President and Cybersecurity Coordinator for National Security Staff. They made clear that the White House will not support legislation that disrupts the open standards of the Internet.

“While we believe that online piracy by foreign websites is a serious problem that requires a serious legislative response, we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet,” the statement read in part.

Yeah. The best news of the week.

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  • villemar

    But but but Drones Hates Base Indefinite Detention FEMA Hitler

  • muselet

    Good news indeed.

    For those who care, John August and Craig Mazin gave a quick writer’s-eye view of SOPA on their podcast this week. Nickel summary: piracy is real and is a real problem, but the solution is unlikely to be anything proposed by legislators who have no earthly idea what they’re doing.

    The discussion of piracy runs (very roughly) from 29:10: to 37:52; or, if you prefer, it starts roughly halfway through the transcript.

    –alopecia

  • jjasonham

    I love the White House’s “We The People” Petitions. They’ve responded to each of the one’s I’ve participated in.

  • mrbrink

    I’m just glad I’ll still be able to ignore the offer to buy knock off Air Jordans and Gucci sunglasses from China-based internet merchant trolls.

    America outsourced a little freedom and extended rights to an area of unregulated commerce in a way that saves the international black market a lot of legal hassles and obstacles, further exposes the American consumer market to cheaper inferior goods, and I for one just can’t wait for The Bai Cheng and Chung Peng After Party Show Go!

    In a way, this is what we’re supposed to be doing as a beacon for bacon, and freedom does get a reprieve with the Obama administration’s rejection of government powers to regulate international internet commerce trolls, so some good was done in the area of promoting freedom at home and abroad.

    I dig.

    • JMAshby

      Just a spinoff of your comment – I have personally met people who, despite being market loving conservatives, knowingly and gladly buy knockoffs from Chinese vendors so they can get some 100 dollar cabinet knobs for 10 dollars.

      • mrbrink

        That’s a lot of knobs.

  • clay perkins

    Whew…this is almost as big a relief as when he threatened to veto the NDAA.

    • mrbrink

      I remember my first encounter with the National Defense Authorization Act FY2012. I was up late, back in the 80′s as an 8 year old man, chain smoking hookers and playing Q-bert on Atari 5200 in the top bunk of a used Airstream trailer hitched to a Sgt. Pepper dream that we bought for peanuts off an abused circus elephant somewhere between Hell and Harvey the Rabbit. We had been driving it hard for days when we finally stopped at a roadside motel made from old whiskey billboards, government cheese, and semen boogers. That’s when it hit me. NDAA was everywhere. It’s in our water, our radio waves, our LSD’s DNA. NDAA gives both light and darkness. We must now face every NDAA with anonymous vigilance at your nearest McDonald’s and throw off our 250GB X-Boxes in solidarity against the Matrix sentinels coming for our last ounce of life giving paranoia.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ALW5OO4MN2ZKXDX44A2B7BJJYU Chris

    Didn’t they also oppose the NDAA as well, at least until Obama signed it into law?