Unemployment Down in Swing States

New data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics today shows that the unemployment rate has fallen across the board in key swing states.

via WaPo

* Colorado (from 8.2 percent in August to 8.0 percent in September)

* Florida (from 8.8 percent to 8.7 percent)

* Iowa (from 5.5 percent to 5.2 percent)

* Nevada (from 12.1 percent to 11.8 percent)

* North Carolina (from 9.7 percent to 9.6 percent)

* Ohio (from 7.2 percent to 7 percent)

* Wisconsin (from 7.5 percent to 7.3 percent)

Ohio’s unemployment rate of 7 percent is the lowest in four years.

This is the last announcement on unemployment the Bureau of Labor Statistics will make for individual states before the election.

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  • bphoon

    This, together with other economic indicators such as increasing home starts, higher numbers of home permits, increasing retail sales, increasing home values, declining home inventory, declining first-time claims for unemployment benefits and declining national unemployment, is starting to show a trend of sustainable improvement in the economy. It comes just in time. To the extent that voters pay any attention to these, the GOP’s claims that the economy is weak will sound increasingly like old news. It will be Romney who will seem out of touch even as he claims that Obama is.

    A very strong case can be made that Obama already has a plan for his second term: it’s a continuation of his plan for the first and it’s working.

    I wonder when claims from the right that the government is rigging the numbers will start again. Three, two, one…

  • gescove

    Countdown to Village declarations that this is bad for Obama (and/or good for John McCain) in THREE, TWO, ONE…

  • mrbrink

    If this election was really about “jobs and the economy,” or “the issues,” for Republicans, the president would win by the largest margin in American history.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1730451827 Jane Phillips

    Campaign spending in swing states = uptick in employment. Like the 2010 census, perhaps?