Helping The Apocalypse

According to a new study, belief in the biblical end times makes people less likely to support measures to alleviate the climate crisis:

The United States has failed to take action to mitigate climate change thanks in part to the large number of religious Americans who believe the world has a set expiration date.

Research by David C. Barker of the University of Pittsburgh and David H. Bearce of the University of Colorado uncovered that belief in the biblical end-times was a motivating factor behind resistance to curbing climate change.

“[T]he fact that such an overwhelming percentage of Republican citizens profess a belief in the Second Coming (76 percent in 2006, according to our sample) suggests that governmental attempts to curb greenhouse emissions would encounter stiff resistance even if every Democrat in the country wanted to curb them,” Barker and Bearce wrote in their study, which will be published in the June issue of Political Science Quarterly.

Call me alarmist, but this is psychotic behavior: actually allowing climatological disasters because of a religious prediction of the end of the world.

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  • Draxiar

    I am ill equipped to understand ignorance on a galactic scale such as this. My brain, to keep from imploding on itself, shuts down.
    Did any of them think that maybe if God is to appear at the end times that it’ll be pissed at what happened to one of it’s houses?

  • trgahan

    I really think this is not so much about a true belief in end times, but by claiming a belief in end times (especially one coming soon) it removes the collective social obligations that, though differing, are part of being a Christian and as a U.S. citizen BUT so disgust your average conservative.

    Basically, they are looking for an excuse that justifies their tribal, xenophobic, and racially motived selfishness. Unfortunately, there are too many conmen parading as preachers willing give it all a veneer of theological legitimacy (which it isn’t) to make a buck off this group of hate filled suckers.

    • Christopher Foxx

      Exactly. It’s part and parcel of the “make the facts fit the conclusion I want to reach” selfish approach they take to reality.

      “I don’t want to clean my room. Therefore, I’ll ignore the parents who are telling me I have to be responsible, the doctors who are telling me the mess is making me sick, the neighbors who are complaining about the stench, etc. I’ll dismiss them all as crackpots who are lying and instead believe in my imaginary friend who told me I don’t have to because the house is going to blow up on Friday.

      Because that way I don’t have to clean my room.”

  • http://twitter.com/tlavely Tony Lavely

    Didn’t Chez write something about religion and the beliefs? When the rabbi wrapped himself in plastic, but not tightly enough?