Future Republicans Will Win You With Better Messaging

On a platform of “good government services” and “working with the public,” The Young Republican National Federation(18-40-ish)are preferring to focus their message of the future on trickle down economics and civic involvement, and leave the nastiness of social issues, like poverty and political disenfranchisement– due to austerity and greed– to the bickering uncouth masses to sort out.

The country is becoming more urban and diverse, two details that favor Democrats. In 2012, blacks and Hispanics overwhelmingly went for the president; Obama also got 55% of the women’s vote, 60% of voters under 30 and almost 70% of the vote in cities with 500,000 people or more.

Worse than the numbers is the impression they make. In a recent study, another young GOP group, the College Republicans, put it bluntly: the GOP is seen as “closed-minded, racist, rigid, (and) old-fashioned.”

Don’t worry, they’ve got all the solutions. As outgoing chair Lisa Strickan who also “serves on the city council of Highland Heights, a Cleveland suburb,” explains the plight of the youth of today,

“You have a lot of people graduating college who are in serious debt and are having trouble finding a job, and if you asked them about social issues, they would say, ‘I’m having trouble surviving here.’”

“The social media, particularly for some low-information voters or younger voters, is important, just to keep up with the trends,” Stickan says.

Ah, crush their economy and they’ll come crawling back to you with pro-libertarian retweets.

Rep. Martha Roby of Alabama, a fellow Young Republican, says,

“Now, more than ever, our party needs bright young people engaged in meaningful conversation, with fresh ways to implement our conservative ideas,” she said. “Now is your turn.”

It’s not about becoming Democrat-lite, it’s about staying true to the conservative principles we hold dear,” she said. “But we have to find a different way to talk about it.”

If you can’t explain your principles without getting your tongue caught in the rape & abortion cookie jar, maybe your principles need to be kicked in the balls.

Tyler Deaton’s is “a strong believer in low taxes, fiscal responsibility and civic involvement. He attended a Christian liberal arts school. He is a Republican.”

And he’s gay. See, Tyler thinks that the best path forward for the GOP is to be the ones who stop defending DOMA and DADT. Rather than giving any credit to a “Democrat” for trying to balance a budget while setting new civil rights standards, he’s gonna stand by his party of anti-gay religious woman-beater wackaloons.

The Young Republican National Federation chose as their keynote speaker this year to be Jeff Sessions(R-AL).

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  • trgahan

    So basically they are doubling down on the greed and selfishness parts of the platform (be a good little college degree holding middle manager and you will be rewarded, we promise!) with a strong sprinkling of “welfare queen” anti-safety net for “the other” dog whistling?

    Yeah, that will bring in the women and minorities…

  • astrocat96

    As an Alabamian, fuck Jeff Sessions. Fuck him right in his smug face.

  • BlueTrooth

    In other words, they want to experiment with going full tilt Libertarian. Why not just change the name and save the trouble of resurrecting a dead brand? After all, it IS just “branding” we’re talking about. The same ideas with different words and younger faces can attract a percentage of the young, white demo, but not enough to cover the attrition at the high end (65 and older). Republicans only hope is to attract moderate Democrats and primarily the Latino vote. That would mean a radical change in immigration, equal rights, women’s health and race relations. The “social issues” that are directly tied to economic issues. By declaring an embrace of Libertarianism in their platform, they could restate the social issues in economic terms. But as long as the Republican brand is used, all of their proposals will be tied to racism, inequality and status quo. The big stumbling block would be the fundamental issue of Monetary policy. While Rick Perry flirted with “end the Fed” rhetoric, he limited that criticism to Bernanke and essentially proposed “reform” rather than abolishing it. You see, the big Corporate donors aren’t too keen on the “end the Fed” idea, they get a really good deal on borrowing from the Fed. There’s also the issue of taxes. Libertarianism calls for repeal of the 16th Amendment. Sounds great and there’s an intellectual debate on taxing “labor wages” as “profit”. But just imagine the monumental task of managing THAT transition! The potential for a massive failure is a risk that only the hardest of hardcore Libertarians would assume. The big challenge is much bigger than messaging or semantics or distracting with economics. The big challenge for Republicans is convincing Americans that “conservatism” is necessary or even desirable in the Technological Age.

  • muselet

    I’m going to go out on a limb and predict that pasting a shiny young happy face sticker on the GOP’s closed-mindedness, racism, rigidity and old-fashionedness isn’t going to help the party’s prospects.

    At least I hope it doesn’t.

    –alopecia

  • Victor_the_Crab

    Here is the new brand. Same as the old brand.

  • Christopher Foxx

    “Now, more than ever, our party needs bright young people engaged in meaningful conversation, with fresh ways to implement our conservative ideas,” she said.

    Alas, this actually shows a rigid adhering to the old ideas. The presumption is that the conservative ideas are correct, all that’s needed is a new way of implementing them, somehow. There’s an unshakable belief that the problem lies in how they’re doing things. No “conservative”, including the “new” ones, ever questions whether what they’re trying to do is wrong.

    “Y’know, the problem is that we haven’t been burning this house down the right way. Maybe we should try kerosene instead of gasoline.” Uh, maybe the goal of burning the house down should be re-thunk?