This Is Probably Not All Bad News

Sperm counts are dwindling evidently:

Are today’s young men less fertile than their fathers were? It’s a controversy in the fertility field, with some experts raising the alarm over what some are calling a “sperm crisis” because they believe men’s sperm counts have been decreasing for a decade or more.

Experts here for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology annual conference last week debated the issue for an entire day.

One recent analysis found that in France, the sperm concentration of men decreased by nearly one-third between 1989 and 2005. Most but not all studies from several European nations with large databases and the ability to track health records have found that over the past 15 years or so, the counts of healthy men ages 18 to 25 have significantly decreased. This comes after a prominent study from the 1990s suggested that sperm count has decreased by half over the last half-century.

Considering how human beings are consuming far more of the planet’s resources than we should be, it might not be all bad that male fertility might be declining. We can’t feed the people who are here now, much less the countless billions still to come. Perhaps this is nature making a course correction.

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  • BillAndersoot

    Insert NSFW sperm joke here…

  • Bubble Genius

    Well, low sperm count has also been common in obese men, and Viagra also has been linked to lower fertility. I’d blame unhealthy living and pharmaceuticals before nature.

  • Oscar Jimison

    “….over the past 15 years or so, the counts of healthy men ages 18 to 25 have significantly decreased.”

    I wonder if going through their teens slamming their balls against stair railings while trying skate board/bicycle stunts, has anything to do with it. Seriously, have you seen “Ridiculousness” on MTV? Every other stunt or prank ends with someone getting bashed in the crotch. These kids have no regard for their testicles whatsoever.

  • Christopher Foxx

    We can’t feed the people who are here now, much less the countless billions still to come.

    Actually, we can. Sufficient food is available to feed the world. We just have chosen not to.

    • mrbrink

      Yeah, I agree. I would add to that– house, clothe, and heal.

      We could have self-sustaining skyscrapers devoted to producing acres and acres of fruits and vegetables year round. We could have quadrillion dollar infrastructure projects devoted to preserving clean water, while building solar and wind-powered cities, modernized transportation, sanitation– we could be shooting our toxic landfills into outer space! Take that, Sun!

      But we waste resources. Misappropriate them. Selfishly abuse the wrong ones– foolishly neglect the right ones.

      I’ve never been one to decry the possibility that we just might have to make some more room on the big bus over time, and the idea that there’s just not enough food and shelter to go around reminds me of the wealthy class’s logic that took place on the Titanic.

      Kind of like twelve men to a lifeboat that’s supposed to seat one billion with leg room.

      • Christopher Foxx

        I like the Titanic lifeboat analogy. Sums it up nicely. I may use that sometime. Thanks!

  • Jone_of_Snark

    Gaia. The Movie.
    This time she means business.