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In other news, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a case from Oklahoma on the ban on RU-486, a medication abortion, meaning the Oklahoma Supreme Court’s decision to strike the ban will be upheld.

When given an opportunity, a lower court in Texas recently decided not to strike down a ban on RU-486. This isn’t over.

Meanwhile, eleven counties in Colorado will vote on secession tomorrow. And while that is ridiculous on its own, it’s even more egregious when you consider that some of the counties that will vote to seceded were among the hardest hit by catastrophic flooding in September.

The government was there to help.

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  • Clancy

    Ashby, those counties are not voting to secede from the U.S., but from Colorado. Their beef is primarily the same as all mostly rural(ish) counties out west: they consist of mostly evangelical, gun-loving, social conservatives who are becoming increasingly marginalized by demographic trends within the state. There’s really very little difference between “Northern Colorado,” and say Eastern Oregon, Eastern Washington, and Northern California. And, while all these areas proclaim to hate the federal government, they are entirely dependent upon it for jobs, farm subsidies, grazing and mineral rights, basic infrastructure, and disaster relief (when necessary).

  • Richard_thunderbay

    Rand Paul has been busted yet again for plagiarism.

    Sections Of Rand Paul’s Op-Ed On Drug Sentencing Plagiarized From Article Week Earlier

    Portions of the Kentucky senator’s op-ed in The Washington Times appear to be copied word-for-word from an article published a week earlier.
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/sections-of-rand-pauls-op-ed-on-drug-sentencing-plagiarized

    Now that people know now to look for it, I think we’re going to see an avalanche of more examples over the coming days.

  • JozefAL

    I have to wonder WHO is footing the bill for that election in the Colorado counties? After all, it really doesn’t matter what the vote is because of that fantabulous Constitution of ours:

    “New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within theJurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.” (Article IV, Section 3)

    IOW, the Legislature of Colorado has to approve the secession–even if the counties involved get a 100% pro-secession vote, the Colorado General Assembly and the US Congress have the final say. (Without knowing the *exact* Constitutional details–Article IV is pretty skimpy on details–I’d say that at least 33 members of the CO House of Representatives and 18 members of the CO Senate have to approve the secession. Then, it has to be approved by the US House and Senate–presumably with 218 Representatives and 51 Senators–before a new state could be established. I’m sure there’s probably more detailed information somewhere in the US Code that would detail the exact requirements as to whether it requires a simple majority of the whole legislature or a simple majority of those present and voting or if a 3/5 or 2/3 or 3/4 majority is needed.)

    • nerdnam

      And a new state brings in two new Senators. Republicans might actually push for that, but it’s a non starter for Democrats.

  • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

    Is voting on secession in and of itself treason? Is it an “act in furtherance” toward that goal?