Fool’s Errand

James Clyburn (D-SC) gets it exactly right on Democratic defectors in the House.

CLYBURN: “What you saw with those 39 people, maybe nine people had real serious concerns. The fact of the matter is about 30 of them, and I’ve talked to them, were insulating themselves against sound bites. And that’s part of the problem.”

They aren’t merely cowards, they’re also fools. They will have bowed to pressure and have nothing at all to show for it because Republicans are going to attack you regardless.

According to The Hill, the Congressional Leadership Fund is less than impressed by these defectors.

“The clear lie and rank hypocrisy on health coverage will be a major issue next year,” said Dan Conston, communications director for the Congressional Leadership Fund, a GOP super-Pac. [...]

“It’s bad enough that you own ObamaCare. Now to vote for a fix makes you appear duplicitous and to fit the mold of the typical Washington politician,” he said.

Gee, aren’t you glad you sold out your own party for this?

Let me be clear; these “defectors” are still better than Republicans and we will have to endure the occasional embarrassment if we are to elect a Democratic majority in the House. There is no majority without conservative Democrats.

With all of that said, this “defector” business has been blown way out of proportion by the media. But you knew it would be.

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  • Norbrook

    My representative was one of the 39, and yes, he got a rather scathing letter from me on that score, particularly since he was one of the votes *for* the ACA when it first passed.

    That said, I also know who ran against him, and to be honest, the nutjob teabaggers the Republicans ran were far and away worse when they ran, and if they’d been elected, worse for this district and the country. So while I have times like this where I’m seriously pissed off at him, I also recognize that he’s about as electable a Democrat in this district as we’re going to get, and on the whole, he’s still better than the Republicans.

    • MorganleFay

      Sometimes I threaten with , ‘I will support any challenger who supports the ACA, blah, blah, blah..’ ‘Why shouldn’t I support a Republican, if you won’t support my values, blah, blah, blah..’, then hold your nose and vote for them anyway if you have to.
      At least they should know, there is more one the one side they hear from.

      I got a letter from my senator (Toomey) that started; “The whole law is unworkable.”

      I responded with;

      “The law is ABSOLUTELY workable, but I agree that private insurers all always going to be problematic middlemen.

      Perhaps it is time to include the public option.”

      Maybe we need to keep bringing that up.

      It won’t pass, but at least we keep it in the conversation. The public option would certainly be a fix, since they “care” so much.

  • Christopher Foxx

    They aren’t merely cowards, they’re also fools. They will have bowed to pressure and have nothing at all to show for it because Republicans are going to attack you regardless.

    Be careful, JM. Suggesting Democrats are failing to stand up when they should doesn’t go over well with some commenters here.

    • Pink No More

      God, I forget how bad you have it sometimes.

      • Christopher Foxx

        As I said, doesn’t go over well.

  • Christopher Foxx

    “The clear lie and rank hypocrisy on health coverage will be a major issue next year,” said Dan Conston,

    makes you appear duplicitous and to fit the mold of the typical Washington politician,” he said.

    And nobody knows lies and rank hypocrisy on health coverage and appearing duplicitous better than a Republican.

  • Christopher Foxx

    From the gets it exactly right link:

    Asked about the Democratic defections on ABC’s “This Week With George Stephanopoulos,” Sen Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) said, “they are just responding to the worries of their constituents.”

    And the way to respond is to confront the lies and explain to your constituents how they are better off with the ACA then their old policies. Not to pander to their bases fears. Of course, that would require the political leader actually, y’know, lead.