Quote of the Day

“We write today in reconsideration of “The Gettysburg Address,” delivered by then-President Abraham Lincoln in the midst of the greatest conflict seen on American soil. Our predecessors, perhaps under the influence of partisanship, or of strong drink, as was common in the profession at the time, called President Lincoln’s words “silly remarks,” deserving “a veil of oblivion,” apparently believing it an indifferent and altogether ordinary message, unremarkable in eloquence and uninspiring in its brevity.

In the fullness of time, we have come to a different conclusion.” Harrisburg Patriot & Union newspaper retracting its contemporaneous panning of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

Good for them. It only took 150 years to own up to it.

(ht Tony Munter)
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  • Badgerite

    Better late than never!

  • D_C_Wilson

    Ah, my hometown newspaper. They haven’t really improved much since the Civil War.

    Well, in fairness, most newspapers in the 19th century were unabashed party organs. They were much like Fox except for the claim of being “Fair and Balanced.” The idea that reporters should be objective is really a 20th century invention. It’s likely the Patriot was wedded to the Democratic Party at the time and bashed a republican like Lincoln just as a matter of course.

    • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

      OT….You’re originally from Harrisburg? I went to HS in Mechanicsburg, PA and half my family still lives in the area. (Forgive me if we’ve discussed this before, I have vague recollections that we have….my brain is not what she used to be).

      • D_C_Wilson

        I’m living outside Harrisburg right now on the East Shore. Getting the hell out next year, though.

        • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

          I went back a few months ago for a funeral and I have to say, I miss the greenery and mountains but I sure don’t miss the culture.

  • mrbrink

    Courageous move. So brave.

    Baby steps, baby steps.

    Great piece of follow-up history.