Same-Sex Marriage Opponents in Hawaii Should Be Ashamed of Themselves

The cavalcade of angry, ignorant people testifying in Honolulu against the passage of same-sex marriage ought to be ashamed of themselves. So much for the spirit of aloha. Though I’m satisfied that the special session of the state legislature in which 5,000 citizens are planning to testify is being recorded for posterity. This way future generations can put names and faces to the ignorance.

Hawaii should’ve been the first state to pass marriage equality, given its firstness on civil unions. Instead, it’s the 15th state. Maybe.

Even in “paradise,” there are people like this:

Tenari Maafala, the President of Hawaii’s police union and an active police officer with the Honolulu Police Department, who testified that he would never enforce a law requiring same-sex marriage.

“You would have to kill me,” he told the lawmakers.

Maafala said that same-sex marriage is contrary to his religious views and, “I stand by my beliefs.”

Of course no one’s forcing Maafala to marry another man. Nor is anyone asking him to change his religious beliefs regarding the issue (though he probably should). Maafala is compelled to serve and protect all of the various ethnic and religious groups that live in Hawaii — a true melting pot — even though his religion might fall in direct conflict with the traditions of those people. So why not LGBT citizens who want to be married? Pure ignorance and hatred. That’s the difference.

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  • Ipecac

    I’m not sure what he thinks allowing same-sex marriage would require him to enforce. The law doesn’t “require” same-sex marriage, that’s absurd.

    In addition to being a hateful bigot, he’s also confused.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=663669914 Sean Richardson

      As an example, plenty of hospitals still give grief to same-sex couples, even where it is legal. I would assume from what this officer said that if a legally married gay man called him to say that a hospital was, for instance, denying him visitation, he would do nothing to help him enforce his rights.

  • i_a_c

    The hell does being a police officer have anything to do with same-sex marriage? Exactly zero.

    Stow this asshole’s opinion in File 13; it’s irrelevant to anything actually going on in the world.

    • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

      Unfortunately, hatred and bigotry usually come in package deals so there’s a good chance he’s got other prejudices equally horrendous. And THAT is a problem when it comes to being a LEO.

      • i_a_c

        You make a good point, bigoted LEOs are an issue. So it’s relevant to the people whose faces he may spit in.

  • GrafZeppelin127

    Maafala … testified that he would
    never enforce a law requiring same-sex marriage.”

    How does that work, exactly? How does a police officer “enforce a law requiring same-sex marriage”? For that matter, how does a law “requir[e] same-sex marriage”?

    Jeebus fleebing cripes on a popsicle stick. This person is an officer of the law? How does he not understand the difference between what the law allows, what it requires, and what it prohibits? Between the law allowing (or, not prohibiting) something, and the law requiring something?

    Why do these people try so fleebing hard to feel persecuted and put-upon? Is the entire country now populated by 14-year-old girls?

    • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

      You know how much I respect you, right? But your statement:

      Is the entire country now populated by 14-year-old girls?

      is an insult to 14-year-old girls.

      • GrafZeppelin127

        Usually I put a disclaimer saying “no insult to 14-year-old girls intended.” Guess I just forgot to do that here. :(

        • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

          No worries! I was jk

    • D_C_Wilson

      I honestly think that some of these nuts believe that the law will make gay marriage mandatory for everyone.

  • Robert Scalzi

    I am sick of people that get paid by tax $$ spouting their religious bullshit – we need a stronger law to keep these people from getting any jobs in the public sector PERIOD and especially out of positions of authority – We need an IRON CURTAIN separating church and state to keep religious zealots like this one and many others as far from the GOVT they hate as possible -

  • D_C_Wilson

    Maafala is compelled to serve and protect all of the various ethnic and religious groups that live in Hawaii

    Based on his statement, I question whether he is actually doing that with respect to all of the citizens of Hawaii.

  • wayne

    Let me be the first to offer him the blindfold…..

  • Badgerite

    If you take employment with the federal or state or even local government, the position does not allow you to do only those parts of your job duty that comport with your religious beliefs. A police officer is there to enforce the law. Period. They do not get the option of enforcing only those laws that their particular religion approves of. If he can’t enforce the law as enacted through our democratic process and feels the conflict with his religious beliefs is too great, then he should seek other employment. I can’t see any reason for there to be talk of ‘killing’. If he can’t abide by the law itself, how can he enforce the law?

    • JozefAL

      Yeah. You’d have to wonder how he’d react if his religion says that women must not have power over men (the old “the head of woman is man” saw from 1 Corinthians) and his immediate superior was a woman? Would he willfully undermine her authority at every turn (and then when he was fired for insubordination, turn around and sue for religious-based discrimination) or would he do his job and respect her status as his boss?

      • Christopher Foxx

        Would he willfully undermine her authority at every turn

        Undoubtedly. But not openly. That’s not how cowards exercise the courage of their convictions.

    • MiddleMittenLiberal

      As opposed to the pharmacy tech (in some states ) that can decide (on moral grounds!) that they won’t give you your prescription (birth control, morning after, etc.).

  • muselet

    Maafala said that same-sex marriage is contrary to his religious views and, “I stand by my beliefs.”

    This is substantively no different than someone sixty years ago railing against interracial marriages. Or someone eighty years ago railing against interreligious marriages.

    There are individuals out there who need to realize that society is made up of people who do not necessarily share their particular religious or cultural beliefs, and who nevertheless forbear from discriminating against (or visiting violence upon) them. The very least they can do is show the same restraint.

    The cavalcade of angry, ignorant people testifying in Honolulu against the passage of same-sex marriage ought to be ashamed of themselves.

    I’ve yet to be convinced they are capable of that emotion.

    –alopecia

    • JozefAL

      Muselet, did you read the story out of Louisiana from a couple of years ago where a justice of the peace (or some similar position) actually REFUSED to marry an interracial couple because he didn’t believe it was right? I can’t recall if he used religion as a basis but it still happened. (I would note that most of the hostility against interracial marriage didn’t really have a religious base. It was almost entirely a cultural thing. After all, interracial marriage was banned in California but that was really more a White/Asian ban, and Texas’s interracial marriage ban had as much to do against Whites with Native Americans and Mexicans as it did against Blacks. Of course, you can argue that the cultural bias developed from a religious bias but a large portion of the bias has to do with that little inherent racism passed down to American society by the Puritans. After all, the early Virginia colony didn’t have a problem with the men interacting and even marrying Native women whereas in Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay, every form of intercourse–except sexual–was okay between the colonists and the Natives.)

      • muselet

        The Louisiana story sounds familiar. I think either Bob or Ashby posted something on it at the time.

        And I did say “religious or cultural beliefs,” although it’s nearly impossible to unsnarl the two. The sad thing about Tenari Maafala’s testimony is that if his family has been in Hawaii for more than about two generations, he’s the product of commingled religions and cultures.

        –alopecia

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=663669914 Sean Richardson

        I don’t think it was religious; if I remember right, his concern troll logic was that they or their children would be harshly judged.

        • Christopher Foxx

          if I remember right, his concern troll logic was that they or their children would be harshly judged.

          “Think of the children!” I don’t think there is anything someone could say that shows they don’t really care about the kids at all than that.

    • Christopher Foxx

      I’ve yet to be convinced they are capable of that emotion

      They are not. Else, they wouldn’t behave this way. Q.E.D.