Scott Brown Chooses Freedumb

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The Associated Press obtained excerpts from Scott Brown’s announcement that he will formally enter the Senate race in New Hampshire and apparently someone told him this would be a winning message.

“Along with our money and our health plans, for a lot of us, it feels like we’re losing our liberty, too. Obamacare forces us to make a choice, live free or log on — and here in New Hampshire, we choose freedom,” Brown planned to tell supporters Thursday night.

Live free or log on?

I don’t think Scott Brown is really this monumentally stupid; I think this is a cynical ploy that won’t come off as genuine.

And how could it? Live free or log on? Less than 7 percent of New Hampshire’s insured obtains health insurance on the individual market according to the Associated Press. Is Scott Brown going to win an election with the 22,000 people who sacrificed their liberty by accessing healthcare.gov ahead of the March 31st deadline?

Medicaid has been expanded in New Hampshire, covering as many as 50,000 people who previously had no health insurance. Does Scott Brown choose “freedom” and liberty(!) for them?

Choosing “freedom” for them means kicking them off their healthcare.

With the law’s success, campaigning against Obamacare will soon become just as toxic as campaigning against Medicare or Social Security.

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  • Sabyen91

    The freedom to…get sick or in an accident and have the taxpayer pay for it. Freedom! Wooooo!

  • muselet

    You’re not truly free unless you can go bankrupt because of a medical bill.

    –alopecia

  • swift_4

    I am not optimistic, but it would be nice if the somewhat conservative people of New Hampshire could realize that this guy is a completely full of shit corporate tool. I know they love their pickup trucks there, but if they fall for the “I have a truck” line like Massachusetts did, they will have marked themselves as gullible hicks.

  • WiscoJoe

    A good friend of mine (artist, part-time worker, self-described ‘radical’) refused to purchase insurance out of some self-serving notion of ‘civil disobedience.’ (Actually I’m fairly certain it was because he would’ve rather continued his pack-a-day cigarette habit and hard-drinking ways then perhaps take better control of his budget and health, but let’s just take him at his word…) In the middle of February he went into the E.R. complaining of severe joint pain. He was diagnosed with a rare fungal infection and had to undergo emergency surgery, followed by a week of recovery in the hospital. His bills topped $100,000. He was able to enroll in Obamacare in time for it to go in effect on March 1, so it’s now covering his rehabilitation, daily checkups, and medications, but he’s still stuck with a $100,000 medical bill. Collection agents are already circling. He’s held a few fundraisers and friends have set up a website to help collect donations to offset his bills. He’ll most likely end up in debt for decades to come, ruining his credit and largely setting the terms of the rest of his adult life.

    Would Scott Brown please explain to us how this story represents a choice between logging on or living free? Is freedom just another word for nothing left to lose? Does Scott Brown think it is preferable that my friend is now relying on charity and facing life-long financial problems as the result of his sudden illness? Or does Scott Brown think my friend should have just accepted his freak illness as just the price of ‘liberty,’ and accepted a premature death rather than seek out medical care?

    It’s kind of a trip to see the apparently ‘conservative’ party be so open about encouraging young people to engage in irresponsible and short-sighted behavior. What’s next? Encouraging people to drive without seat-belts and disobey traffic signs, rather than give up their ‘freedom’ to drive recklessly?

    Modern-day Republicans have devolved into something similar to those out-of-control teens that appear regularly on shows like Maury. “You can’t tell me what to do. I do what I want.” And like those talk show freaks, the boos and derision of the audience at large only seems to encourage their entitled and myopic sense of rebellion.

    • Christopher Foxx

      A good friend of mine (artist, part-time worker, self-described ‘radical’) refused to purchase insurance out of some self-serving notion of ‘civil disobedience.’

      Sounds like exactly the opposite of self-serving, actually.